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Objective Type Set
Online MCQ Assignment
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1. Which of the following extracts first element from the following list ?

 > x <- list(foo = 1:4, bar = 0.6)

a) x[[1]].
b) x[1].
c) x[[0]].
d) None of the mentioned

View Answer

Answer: a [Reason:] The [[ operator can also use named indices so that you don’t have to remember the exact ordering of every element of the list.

2. Point out the correct statement :
a) You can also use the $ operator to extract elements by name
b) $ operator can be used with computed indices
c) The [[ operator can only be used with literal names
d) All of the mentioned

View Answer

Answer: a [Reason:] You don’t need the quotes when you use the $ operator.

3. What would be the output of the following code ?

> x <- list(foo = 1:4, bar = 0.6, baz = "hello")
> name <- "foo"
> x$name

a) 1
b) 2
c) 3
d) NULL

View Answer

Answer: b [Reason:] Element “name” doesn’t exist.

4. What would be the output of the following code ?

> x <- list(foo = 1:4, bar = 0.6, baz = "hello")
> name <- "foo"
> x[[name]]

a) 1 2 3 4
b) 0 1 2 3
c) 1 2 3 4 5
d) All of the mentioned

View Answer

Answer: a [Reason:] One thing that differentiates the [[ operator from the $ is that the [[ operator can be used with computed indices.

5. Point out the wrong statement :
a) $ operator semantics are similar to that of [[
b) The [[ operator can take an integer sequence if you want to extract a nested element of a list
c) The $ operator can be used to extract multiple elements from a list
d) All of the mentioned

View Answer

Answer: c [Reason:] The [ operator can be used to extract multiple elements from a list.

6. What would be the output of the following code ?

> x <- list(a = list(10, 12, 14), b = c(3.14, 2.81))
> x[[c(1, 3)]]

a) 13
b) 14
c) 15
d) All of the mentioned

View Answer

Answer: b [Reason:] The [[ operator can take an integer sequence if you want to extract a nested element of a list.

7. What would be the output of the following code ?

> x <- list(aardvark = 1:5)
> x$a

a) 1 2 3 4 5
b) 2 3 5
c) 1 3 3 5
d) 1 2 3

View Answer

Answer: a [Reason:] Partial matching of names is allowed with [[ and $.

8. Which of the followin code extracts 1st element of the 2nd element ?

 > x <- list(a = list(10, 12, 14), b = c(3.14, 2.81))

a) x[[c(2, 1)]].
b) x[[c(1, 2)]].
c) x[[c(2, 1,1)]].
d) All of the mentioned

View Answer

Answer: a [Reason:] [ operator always returns an object of the same class as the original.

9. What would be the output of the following code ?

> x <- list(aardvark = 1:5)
> x[["a", exact = FALSE]]

a) 1 2 3 4 5
b) 2 3 5
c) 1 3 3 5
d) 1 2 3

View Answer

Answer: a [Reason:] This is often very useful during interactive work if the object you’re working with has very long element names.

10.What would be the output of the following code ?

> x <- c(1, 2, NA, 4, NA, 5)
> bad <- is.na(x)
> print(bad)

a) FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE TRUE FALSE
b) FALSE TRUE TRUE FALSE TRUE FALSE
c) FALSE FALSE TRUE FALSE TRUE FALSE
d) None of the mentioned

View Answer

Answer: c [Reason:] A common task in data analysis is removing missing values (NAs).

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